I’ve just read Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal, a book lots of people seem to be talking about all of a sudden. It’s a great book, and one I highly recommend. Mostly it is about making better choices for ourselves and our loved ones as we grow old, which is a far cry from startups.

One passage is different though. It’s about courage, which is required in spades if we are to make the most of our old age and if we want to make the most of our startups.

Gawande starts by turning to Plato who wrote “Courage is strength in the knowledge of what is to be feared or hoped” and “Wisdom is prudent strength”.

Which brings me to startups. It takes great courage to found and build a company, to maintain conviction in the face of naysayers, to get back up again when you get knocked down and to persevere when things look helpless. But it is also important to be wise. To know when to carry on or when to change course, or even give up. It was only after Ev and Biz Stone gave up on Odio that we got Twitter.

Gawande goes to on say that at least two kinds of courage are required in ageing and sickness. The courage to seek out the truth of what might happen both on the upside and the downside, and then the courage to act upon it. Again that’s super important at startups – the best founders tirelessly look for ways to expand the upside and ways their companies can go wrong. Other founders put their heads in the sand.

In a further parallel with startups, Gawande notes that ageing and sickness are highly complicated and uncertain, and that it is very hard to build an accurate picture of what’s going on or of the implications of any particular course of action.

It is in this uncertain environment that we must find the courage to act. Very often that choice means deciding which is more important, our hopes or our fears. Do we want the chance of a much better life, or do we simply want to stay alive?

That last question is as relevant in startup boardrooms as it is in the Emergency Room, but it is rare to see the difficult topic of potential permanent decline and failure addressed well enough that the the following course of action gives the best chance of happiness to all concerned. More common is to raise more money if it’s available, keep going with more or less the same plan and only make radical changes when the writing is well and truly on the wall. By this point there is much less cash left, the options for remedial action have become limited and the chances of achieving even a half decent outcome are much reduced.

The starting point for most founders is that they can overcome all the obstacles in their way and overcome what, to many, look like impossible odds. Possessing the self-confidence and resilience to maintain this perspective is an amazing gift that has enabled many entrepreneurs to achieve amazing things and it is something we look for in the founders we back. My closing point in this post though, is that in some situations the right thing to do is to stop trying to achieve the impossible, reduce our level of ambition and start building the best possible future within the constraints that face us.

Contemplating anything other than success is tough for most people involved with startups. Nobody likes a naysayer and fear of being thought of as unambitious or lacking tenacity made me think twice about writing this post. I decided to press ahead because the truth is that only a small fraction of startups achieve unfettered success (we will be happy if one in three of our portfolio are that lucky, and even those will face difficult periods). For the rest finding the courage to face the truth and make difficult decisions early will make them happier in the long run.



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