Archive for the “The Equity Kicker” Category

Nic Brisbourne’s view from London on venture capital and exploiting change in technology and media.

Around nine years ago I read Nicholas Taleb’s seminal texts The Black Swan (2007) and Fooled by Randomness (2001) and I loved them both. For venture investors everywhere The Black Swan suddenly provided a framework and lingua franca for understanding our business – betting on extreme outcomes that have a low probability of occurring, and perhaps more subtly for those working in this world, an understanding role of chance is critical to distinguishing talent from luck (although we all need luck).

But for me the books were about more than these two key takeaways, they were also an amusingly written philosophy of life and a celebration of avoiding the herd mentality and thinking differently.

One small part of that which has stayed with me is Taleb’s oft repeated advice “Don’t run for trains”. I like this advice because running for trains is stressful and it seems to me that we often take on that stress without really thinking it through. There’s a problem, however, which is that sometimes when we miss trains it makes us late, and it’s rude to be late.

When I was riding my bike to work this morning, Taleb’s advice “Don’t run for trains” popped into my mind. That’s happened a fair few times over the years and as I’ve done before I rehearsed the argument made in the previous paragraph. Then, rather than return to thinking about my day as usually would, I pondered the advice a little longer. I wanted to resolve the dichotomy between the good and the bad sides of “not running for trains” and maybe get a better idea of what Taleb was getting at.

For me the answer is that Taleb’s point is to avoid over-valuing short term gains. If you run and get the train it feels good for a short while, but you will have forgotten it before long, so why put yourself through it. Better surely to apply yourself to something that will deliver value over the longer term. This chimes with Taleb’s long term investment strategy. In his books he repeatedly shows his disdain for investors who chase short term gains (he calls them “yield hogs”) whilst not understanding their long term risks. Moreover, running for trains is often a frenzied activity of the type that with hindsight turns out to be ill-advised.

In the startup world, examples of “running for trains” mostly involve chasing short term growth at the expense of long term value:

  • Selling a poor quality product or service which undermines the brand
  • Putting so much advertising on a web page that it destroys the customer experience
  • Tricking people onto a website with a misleading promise



More…

Comments No Comments »

magic-leap-whale-bs

I love the idea of Magic Leap and wish them every success in the world. Who wouldn’t want to see whales leaping out of floors like the one in the picture above?

I also don’t have any inside information about how they’re doing. But I have noted that some in the press are questioning their prospects, alleging that their videos are in effect fakes (including the one from which the still above was taken).

One of the articles I read, finished with a list of tell-tale signs that indicate a company is long on vision, but short on execution (or in this case real tech):

  • Refusing to give a launch date.
  • Refusing to talk about the tech, claiming confidentiality or trade secrets.
  • Using news of investments or hires as evidence of technological progress.
  • Promoting itself on a big stage rather than in a small room.
  • Offering a well-crafted message and vision but becoming immediately vague when pushed on actual details.
  • Offering “exclusive access” – with restrictions.
  • Confusing working hard with making progress.

I offer this list up because some of you will be writing investment decks over the holidays to start fundraising in the New Year and if that’s you, these are mistakes you want to avoid making. At the early stages at which Forward Partners invest, the most common mistakes on this list are being strong on the vision but weak on the details (particularly the short term plan) and assuming time spent on a project equates with progress.

In essence, make sure that when preparing to pitch for funding you have an inspiring big vision, but also ensure the picture you paint is underpinned with a strong plan for execution.



More…

Comments No Comments »

screen-shot-2016-12-06-at-12-57-05

This is a chart from Atomico’s 2016 State of the Nation report. As a UK investor and citizen it’s pleasing to see that we’re the top destination for tech industry migrants by quite some distance.

What’s interesting is that this is a self-reinforcing metric. As noted elsewhere in the report, when people move country to start their company, access to talent is their primary consideration. More talent, therefore, will attract more founders, who will in turn attract more founders.

The UK has always been a very open country, and immigration from the US and India (two countries with whom we have strong historical ties) are a big driver of this statistic – although we are also the top destination for intra European tech migrants too.

We built this success story in the pre-Brexit era. Our challenge now is to maintain it post-Brexit.



More…

Comments No Comments »

Most VCs will say that to evaluate deals they look at the market size, the product and the quality of the team. Different investors place different weights on the three elements but as a rule earlier stage investors place more emphasis on the team and later stage investors place more emphasis on the market. That’s because early stage companies find it easier to change their market than their team whilst later stage companies find it easier to change their team than their market.

Some very early stage investors go as far as to say that for them team is everything. If the founder is great that’s all they need to know to write a cheque. At Forward Partners we don’t go that far. We always say that the minimum requirement to back a company is a great founder AND a great idea, then for us a great idea encompasses an inspiring product vision in a large market.

Breaking that down a little further, what we’ve learned over the three and a half years we’ve been operating is that our pre-seed investments work best when the ‘great idea’ includes a clear plan for value progression in the first six months. In the sectors in which we invest that nearly always means building momentum with customers. Completing product development and hiring team members definitely helps, but it’s dangerous to assume that will be valued by new investors.

With seed stage investments and later it’s usually obvious how value will be created – by maintaining current growth in revenues or engagement. Hence spending time thinking hard about short term value creation is mostly a discipline for the pre-seed stage.

This week our thinking was put to the test by a highly competent serial entrepreneur with a great team who has a strong idea in a large market but who has yet to build out a clear plan for driving value in the short term. We compared his case with a couple of others in which we’ve invested where the short term plan was much clearer but the longer term thinking was hazier and decided we prefer the latter.

Here’s why.

Given time great entrepreneurs will find their way to big opportunities. The question then becomes “how do we give them the greatest chance of having enough time?”. The best answer to that is to generate the short term momentum which will allow them to raise more money and buy more time to navigate to the big upside. If the short term momentum doesn’t arrive then either the next round will be difficult or the company will fail – both outcomes we seek to avoid.

With most things in life, if you plan for it you are more likely to get it, and generating the momentum required to create value in the short term is no exception.

 



More…

Comments No Comments »

Last night at FPLive I was chatting with an entrepreneur called Nick who has just closed his startup. He talked impressively about what he’d learnt and has an interesting idea for his next company which I am keen to investigate.

There’s an important point lurking in there. He has just failed with his first company but that isn’t putting us off looking at his second. In fact, the lessons he’s learned help his case.

It doesn’t happen as much as it used to but people still talk about the ‘fear of failure’ as being a much more acute problem here in the UK than it is in America, and how that dissuades people from starting companies and holds our startup ecosystem back. That talk gets my back up a bit, partly because fear of failure is rational (it hurts), but mostly because it becomes a self fulfilling prophecy – would be entrepreneurs hear that fear of failure holds our startup ecosystem back which makes them think that failure is more likely and deters them from starting their company.

Returning to my conversation with Nick. He has been working with a large corporate innovation lab and we were talking about what large companies can do to hold onto the entrepreneurs in their ranks and harness their creative power. Getting the incentives right is a big topic, covering 1) how much money they should be allowed to make, 2) how much control they should have and3) what should happen if they fail.

As an investor who’s worked with lots of entrepreneurs I know that if the aim is to retain the best talent the answer to the first two parts of this have to be 1) they can make an awful lot of money and 2) they need to be given control of their startup.

Prior to last night my view on the third point was that companies should make it easier for their employees to be internal entrepreneurs by guaranteeing their jobs in the event of failure. Now I’m not so sure. Nick pointed out that fear of failing is often highly motivating. When your back is up against the wall you are more likely to be out of bed at 6am fixing things, morel likely to burn the midnight oil, and generally more likely to keep battling when the odds start to look impossible. What he has seen is that when people can walk back to their old jobs they are less afraid of failing, that they work fewer hours, and that they give up on the startup idea more easily.

So my emerging view is that fear of failure is not really the problem here. Rather I think we should be working on the other side of the equation – courage. More specifically – how do we help people muster the courage to start companies, even when they understand that painful failure is a possibility.



More…

Comments No Comments »

I first came across the phrase “strong convictions, weakly held” through Marc Andreessen, but a bit of Googling showed me it was originally coined by Paul Saffo, then Director of the Palo Alto Institute for the Future. According to this post he advised his people to think this way for three reasons:

  • It is the only way to deal with an uncertain future and still move forward
  • Because weak opinions don’t inspire confidence or action, or even the energy required to test them
  • Because becoming too attached to opinions undermines your ability to see and hear evidence that clashes with your opinion (confirmation bias)

Saffo came up with this logic almost 15 years ago, and as change happens faster and faster it has become increasingly compelling, to the extent that the importance of having “strong convictions, weakly held” is starting to become somewhat of a cliche amongst many of the best investors I know.

However, it applies to the whole startup world, not just investing. In fact it applies to anyone who is (or should be) searching for the truth, or more properly the closest approximation we can get to it. Much of the time in startups we have to make decisions based on minimal information in an environment that is fast moving and where there is no objectively ‘right’ answer. The best we can do is form an opinion based on the facts in front of us and then have the courage to act on that opinion. Then, and this is often the most difficult bit, we must find the courage to change our opinion if new information suggests we were wrong.

When investing as a VC that means quickly deciding which companies make attractive prospects, having the courage to divert time from other prospects to dive in and investigate them thoroughly, then having the courage to advocate them to our partners, then continuing to be courageous by continuing to search for reasons why a deal might not make sense, and then (if necessary) having the courage to say “I was wrong about this, I don’t think we should invest in this company after all”. This last part is tricky because it requires us to park our ego on the side of the road at a time when we’re already feeling bad about our wasted work and the lost opportunity. What makes it particularly hard is that often the reasons we find for not investing are ones that in hindsight should have been obvious earlier on.

I chose investing as an example because that’s the world I know best, but I could equally have chosen startup product decisions, marketing strategy, choice of tech stack, or hiring decisions. These are all areas where the best people have an ability to form strong opinions quickly and then remain open minded.

Note how this process is about a disciplined search for the best truth that we can find. That search is undermined when ego gets in the way and opinions get entrenched, which is the more natural human behaviour. Our confirmation bias makes us look for supporting data and makes us blind to counter arguments. In the best case this path leads to poorer decisions and in the worst case it results in conflict where protagonists read different sources of information and quote orthogonal facts at each other.

Ultimately it’s the job of founders, CEOs and leaders at every level to build a culture where people have the self confidence and courage to put themselves out there by forming strong opinions quickly and where it’s ok to change your mind later. Leading by example is crucial (as ever) but it’s also important to foster an environment where everyone’s opinions are respected and given space. We make ourselves vulnerable when we express an opinion, especially a strong one, and if we get shut down or dismissed it’s harder to find the courage to do it again the next time.



More…

Comments No Comments »

As the world becomes increasingly mobile centric, we still don’t have a great solution for long tail e-commerce. Smartphones now work amazingly well for Amazon and categories where we buy regularly enough to be bothered to download an app – but that’s fairly limited. In my case it’s limited to Uber, Hailo, Netflix, Spotify, Fy (one of our partner companies) and an app that lets me pay for parking on the streets of Islington where I live. You could maybe include the British Airways app as well, although I use that for checking in rather than buying flights. The point is, that’s a short list, and two of them are subscription services rather than e-commerce apps.

That leaves huge categories that don’t yet have a mobile solution for the mass market – fashion, travel, homewares, non-supermarket food etc. There are apps in all these categories, but they don’t get downloaded that often because we don’t want to clutter our phones up with apps we only use occasionally.

So if native apps aren’t the solution for long tail mobile commerce then we are left with a few other possibilities:

  • mobile browsers
  • bots
  • an instant app experience which gives us app functionality without downloading anything

The second and third categories are where everybody is pinning their hopes right now (and it’s WeChat’s recent announcement about their small programmes that got me thinking about this again), but the challenge with these are search, discovery and UI. It’s long tail ecommerce we’re talking about here, so we need a search experience that’s open to any retailer in the way that Google is, and then when you get to their site the purchase experience must be smooth – it’s not clear how that will work. The promise of bots and WeChat’s small programmes is that they will hold our personal information enabling efficient checkout. That makes a lot of sense, but most of the solutions we have seen so far require the user to learn a set of commands and I can’t see that working for many people.

Meanwhile anecdotally it seems that mobile browsers are slowly offering a stronger buying experience. Retailers sites are increasingly better optimised for mobile and browsers’ auto-fill and credit card storage features are working better, and that’s before Apple pay really gets going.

Moreover, as you can see from the chart below, m-commerce is growing much faster than e-commerce. Much of that growth is within apps, but not all (I couldn’t find stats that broke out browser based m-commerce and app based m-commerce) and that suggests to me that the humble mobile browser might be the final answer for long tail ecommerce merchants after all.

screen-shot-2016-01-04-at-12-00-22-pm

 



More…

Comments No Comments »

I just read a New York Times article that led with the sentence “Deep inside a Silicon Valley unicorn lurks a time bomb”. It turns out that ‘time bomb’ is the much maligned and, I suspect, little understood, liquidation preference.
To be clear, liquidation preferences are sometimes used badly and founders should generally turn away from investors who ask for multiple liquidation preferences. Additionally, they introduce a small amount of complexity and an element of misalignment between the investor and the common stock holder (usually the founder).
For these reasons our investments at Forward Partners are always in ordinary shares.
However, most of the later rounds or companies raise feature simple 1x liquidation preferences and we’re fine with that. To explain why I’m going to look at the role liquidation preferences play in getting deals done.
In any negotiation it’s helpful to look for ways in which the counterparties see things differently to reach other. These differences create the space for win-win solutions and without them negotiations are a zero sum game.
Liquidation preferences are a useful tool because they exploit a difference in the way investors and management see the future. Generally speaking management teams have more confidence in their success than investors do. Not by much, but by enough that it makes sense for them to accept a liquidation preference in exchange for a higher valuation. That trade gives them less dilution and therefore more cash in upside scenarios but less cash (and potentially nothing) in extreme downside scenarios.
This trade off is now so entrenched that it’s become a market standard that most investors and founders make unconsciously, but they are all aware of the implications. Moreover, in the rare situation where investors offer a choice management almost always go for the higher valuation.
Furthermore, provided the instrument is kept simple (i.e. a 1x non-participating preference share) and the company is successful enough to raise a couple of million or more the complexity and misalignment are more than manageable. Then as companies get towards unicorn status management and investors get increasingly sophisticated and their ability to exploit more complex instruments increases.
None of this is to say that some companies haven’t been overvalued and that liquidation preferences haven’t contributed, but it doesn’t sound like a ‘time bomb’ to me.



More…

Comments No Comments »

According to the IAB, US digital advertising revenues grew 19% from H1 2015 to H1 2016. That’s very healthy growth for what is now a $32.7bn market. However, when you look at the numbers in more detail it’s clear that this strong headline performance masks a tonne of turmoil underneath.

Display continues to crater and the growth areas are mobile and video, but the surprising thing to me is how much Facebook and Google are now dominating. As you can see in the embedded tweet below Jason Kint analysed Google and Facebook revenues in the context of this market and found that revenues for all the other digital ad players went down over the last year.

.@iab it does seem relevant to note when you back out Facebook and Google, the digital ad industry actually shrunk in 1st half. #unhealthy pic.twitter.com/x0gRXWz6XT

— Jason Kint (@jason_kint) November 1, 2016

This bears out what we’re seeing in practice, which is that startup founders who want to pay to acquire customers on the internet do so on Facebook and Google. These are the channels that our partner companies have been using recently (in rough order of significance, results skewed towards the companies we know best):

  • Facebook – all properties
  • Google (paid)
  • Google (SEO)
  • Partnerships
  • Content
  • PR
  • Direct Mail
  • Flyering

There are a couple of obvious implications of all this. Firstly, evaluating whether a company can get off to a fast start means analysing whether these channels will work (especially the top two), and secondly startups with advertising based business models will increasingly need some super-special secret sauce.

Then there is the non-obvious implication which Benedict Evans of A16Z has been tweeting about recently, which is that as advertising becomes less effective (at least outside Facebook and Google), innovative companies will find new discovery models that reduce reliance on media spend. Amazon has pulled this trick off in a huge way for their core products and there will be big rewards for those that crack it in other areas.

 



More…

Comments No Comments »

screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-19-16-00

screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-19-25-35

The charts above are both from the new KPMP/CB Insights Venture Pulse Report.

There’s a lot more data contained within, but my read from these is that VC investment is down significantly since the highs we saw in 2015, but is now holding steady at it’s new level, both globally and in the UK. (The last bar in top chart on global investment might suggest a different interpretation, but Q3 is often quiet for venture investment.)

Moreover, overall investment is holding roughly flat despite a big drop in mega-rounds, buoyed up by activity at the earlier stages. Only one new unicorn has been created in Europe this year (11 in the US).

 



More…

Comments No Comments »

McKinsey have just released a report which predicts:

that the global revenue pool from car data monetization could be as high as $750 billion by 2030

That caught my attention for two reasons. Firstly $750bn is a truly huge market to come out on nowhere. For context Gartner predicts the wearables market will be $29bn this year (including Fitbit and smart watches). Secondly, in my experience it’s hard to make money out of data that’s produced as a by-product of another service, at least directly. Lots of startups have ‘sale of data’ lines in their business plans and they very rarely come to much. Rather, the way most companies make money out of the data their service produces is to use it to build better products – the way Google uses our search data to sell better advertising (and build a better search product).

The excitement is coming because cars, particularly electric cars, are increasingly connected and will generate huge amounts of data. To their credit McKinsey developed 30 use cases for automotive data. Most of the aforementioned startups don’t go that far. They just assert that their data will be worth something to somebody.

However, the excitement doesn’t make it much beyond that. Some of the use cases McKinsey lists out are interesting (predictive maintenance, usage based insurance), some a bit so-so from a revenue perspective (emergency call service, over the air software add-ins) and some are merely enabled by internet in the car (car pooling, in-car hot spots).

There isn’t much in the report on how they get from these use cases to a $450-750bn market. There are around 1.2bn cars on the road now so that would be $375-625 per car – which is quite a lot. The most obvious way that will happen is if a chunk of the maintenance and insurance markets start to become counted as part of this total.

That’s already starting to happen, particularly on the insurance side. Overall, I haven’t found the new opportunities I hoped I might when I read the report’s $750bn headline figure.

 



More…

Comments No Comments »

The European Investment Fund (EIF) is an EU institution that exists to stimulate the startup ecosystem by investing in venture capital funds. They have made a huge contribution to the UK scene, backing 37% of UK based venture funds between 2011 and 2015. Moreover, they are often the first investor to commit to these funds making their role even more important than the headline figure suggests. Back in July Bloomberg wrote:

It is an open secret among British venture capitalists that many of their funds would have never gotten off the ground without a hefty check from the European Investment Fund

To state the obvious, if the venture funds hadn’t gotten off the ground, the startups they back would also still be on the drawing board. So the EIF has had a huge positive impact on the UK. It’s a big deal.

And post Brexit there’s a chance we will no longer have their support. That would be very bad news, and might happen as soon as Article 50 is invoked. The EIF hasn’t invested in our fund to date, but they might in the future, so there’s an element of self interest at play here, but this is bigger than Forward Partners and I would still be writing this post if that wasn’t the case.

It’s therefore imperative that maintaining the role of the EIF in the UK is part of our Brexit negotiations. In the medium to long term we could well manage our our own programme for supporting UK venture funds, and the programmes of the British Business Bank augur well in this regard, but replacing the EIF’s programmes would take time and a short term hit to venture funds raised of around 40% would inflict damage on our ecosystem that would take years to repair.

I often get asked about whether the EIF has pulled back from investing in the UK already. There are all sorts of rumours swirling around but the best intelligence I’ve heard, including comments directly from the EIF, tell me that they are carrying on with business as usual. Additionally, I know for sure that one UK fund which closed after the June 23rd referendum has the EIF as an LP.

Earlier this week, David Kelnar of MMC Ventures wrote an interesting blog post setting out the implications of Brexit for UK startups. He included the following passage which describes in detail what we will have to do to keep the EIF investing in the UK. As he mentions, we will need the consent of 33% of EU governments, so this is not something we can take for granted.

The UK’s formal influence over the EIF is limited. The EIF is 60% owned by the European Investment Bank (EIB), 28% by the EU and 12% by 30 individual financial institutions in member countries, with votes cast proportionally. Decisions by the EIB’s Board of Directors require the agreement of one third of EU members. Post-Brexit, therefore, extending the EIF’s core activity to the UK will require at least one third or more of EU members to be supportive. Given the extent to which UK VCs invest across Europe, the attractive returns available from UK funds and the UK’s informal influence, they may well be. Alternatively, other countries may assert their interests to the detriment of the UK.

Other important points are that if the EIF is to keep investing in the UK, the UK will have to keep paying into the EIB, for which a mechanism will need to be established. The good news is that there are precedents, as David notes Israel has a deal which allows the EIF to invest in their country and Norway has something similar.

As with all things Brexit, there is much to do if we are to make the best of our situation. Our task in the startup community is to make sure our agenda doesn’t get forgotten.



More…

Comments No Comments »

screen-shot-2016-10-11-at-14-09-13

Every company has to strike a balance between focusing on being great at what they do and telling the world about it. Some very successful companies lead with hype and have their people permanently scrabbling to keep up. You might call that the Elon Musk school of entrepreneurship. Other successful companies focus on delivering value rather than making promises – Google and Facebook spring to mind as examples here.

There are pros and cons to both approaches. Leading with lots of ‘noise’ and hype can maximise interest in a business, helping to gain attention from investors (thus paving the way for fundraising) and can also ultimately drive growth. However, chaos behind the scenes kills many companies that take this path. Focusing on delivering value first is a safer approach to building companies of substance, but unfortunately this often results in slower growth and can mean that a business is left trailing behind hype-charged competitors.

Here at Forward Partners we’ve focused on delivery first and have prioritised telling our story second. That’s our natural predisposition anyway, but it always seemed that the most important component in our mission was to deliver value to the founders we back and to our investors, rather than telling the world about our work.

Since I founded the business three years ago, we’ve concentrated on building a well-oiled machine which can supercharge our partner companies, providing not only the funding but also the operational help needed to achieve rapid growth. However, as we now enter the next phase of our own growth, we are beginning to focus on telling our story a little more. This is largely in the hope that we can speak to more of the next generation of entrepreneurs and more founders at the earliest stages will understand our unique approach to VC.

A big effort for us recently has been redesigning our website. It has become clear to us over the last year or so that the primary benefits founders get from working with us are speed and certainty of execution, and that comes because when we invest founders gain immense leverage from using our team. We wanted to communicate that message front and centre and also to have a more approachable look and feel. The homepage image you see above provides a flavour but please check the site out for yourself!

As well as working on our marketing materials, we’ve also been building out our press and storytelling function, for both Forward Partners and for some of our partner companies. Last week, we were pleased to be profiled in The Times alongside our partner company Live Better With – a really exciting step forward for our brand and incredible to share it with Tamara Rajah, one of our inspirational entrepreneurs.

 



More…

Comments No Comments »

screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-13-54-30

Regular readers will know that for me the rising pace of change is one of the defining features of the early 21st century. Things are now changing so quickly that traditional structures are breaking down. Within a decade or so we will have adjusted to rapid change as the new normal, but in the short to medium term expect more disruption rather than less.

One example of traditional structures breaking down is that large companies are increasingly unable to keep up via internal innovation. Instead they are looking to partner with the startup ecosystem. Corporate sponsored accelerator programmes are one of the most visible aspects of that partnership, but whilst they command a lot of column inches they are small beer in terms of dollars committed.

The chart above (courtesy of Pitchbook) shows another aspect – direct investment by corporates into startups. Most striking is the rapid growth since 2009, but the dollars involved are also significant. The $26bn so far this year is the total deal value including the contribution from corporates, rather than the contribution itself, but I would guess that the actual corporate contribution will easily top $10bn this year.



More…

Comments No Comments »

I was talking with an old friend on Friday about the fundraising pitch for his startup and how his conversations with VCs were progressing. He’s got a great business and I think he will get his round away, but he felt that he was losing some potential investors because they weren’t buying into the upside of his story.

We discussed how he could add a slide making a better link from his impressive recent results to his vision of the endgame and I hope that will make a difference. We also talked about his personal style. He’s low-key and likes to present plans he feels sure he can deliver, and he has a tendency to caveat the upside. The danger with this approach is that investors are used to a punchier presentation style and assume that if the entrepreneur isn’t punchy, the upside is less likely to be realised. As an investor I feel the same way. I know that there are some founders who successfully under-promise and over-deliver, but the majority of successful founders are the other way around – they have a tendency to over-promise.

Since then I’ve been thinking about how aggressive founders should make their business plans. Here are some guidelines:

  • VCs want to back aggressive plans. That means your growth should be as rapid as possible.
  • The plan must be believable – you must believe it is deliverable.
  • Investors expect most of their investments to fail, and that nearly all under-achieve initial plans. If when you look at it objectively you have a 30-50% chance of hitting yours that’s more than enough – although you should believe in your gut that it’s much more certain than that.
  • You should believe more strongly in the first couple of years than in the out years. If you deliver over 24 months opportunities will almost certainly open up.
  • It’s important to show the path from today to the big upside. A series of big steps with no risky big leaps works best.
  • Increasing your financial projections in the expectation that investors will discount them falls foul of the earlier points, and undermines trust.

It’s common for entrepreneurs to start with a big endgame that they think will work for VCs and then work backwards to build a plan that gets there. If you’re going to take that approach then make sure the plan is credible, as per the advice above. If not think about a smaller goal and perhaps different types of investors.

 



More…

Comments No Comments »