Archive for June 14th, 2018

Tesla is firing around 9% of its employees in an effort to cut costs and eliminate redundancies. Former employees told Business Insider they were surprised by the layoffs.

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Gary Hartman voted for Trump and thought tariffs would save the factory he runs in Berwick, Pennsylvania. Now he's not so sure they're coming.

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Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear filed the suit against Walgreens for its dual role as a distributor and a pharmacy.

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Rising interest rates are adding more pressure in a competitive market where buyers need to move quickly, bid high and make other concessions if they want a house

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<p>The economy is going gangbusters, corporate profits are at record highs, and the world is awash in liquidity.</p>

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Kraft Heinz offers to reimburse young entrepreneurs foiled by rules requiring permits to operate a lemonade stand

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If you're looking to stretch Social Security income, consider these locations for the best return on retirement dollars.

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<p></p><p>Stocks rose on Thursday as sentiment on Wall Street was lifted by economic data that blew past expectations and dealmaking activity in the media sector.</p>

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The economy’s going gangbusters, corporate profits are at record highs and the world is awash in liquidity.

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The countries being targeted by President Donald Trump’s newly imposed trade tariffs are retaliating with their own tariffs on U.S. goods that may have major implications for Americans including job losses and pricier items.

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The countries being targeted by President Donald Trump’s newly imposed trade tariffs are retaliating with their own tariffs on U.S. goods that may have major implications for Americans including job losses and pricier items. When Trump originally announced tariffs on metals — a 25% tariff on imported steel and a 10% tariff on imported aluminum — back in March, he exempted U.S. allies like Canada, Mexico and and the European Union from being taxed on those exports until June 1. Now that Trump has let the exemptions expire, those U.S. allies are fighting back with trade tariffs of their own on American goods, primarily on metals and agricultural products. Tariffs on steel could have particularly negative impacts on Americans because the U.S. isn’t capable of producing the amount it needs, instead relying on 5 million tons of imported steel last year, according to the U.S. Commerce Department. Economists tell MONEY those tariffs, or a tax on an imported goods, implemented by Trump could increase costs for Americans on everyday items like cars and beer because U.S. companies. “We’re going to have pay more for the goods that we buy and that makes us poorer. There’s just no question about it,” says Lawrence White, an economics professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business. Trump’s new trade policy has been criticized by politicians on both sides on the aisle in the U.S. and around the world, where it took center stage at the recent G-7 Summit. Some Americans could also lose their jobs as companies with already slim margins struggle to make ends meet with rising costs thanks to retaliatory tariffs. For example, if Canada slaps a 25% retaliatory tariff on American whiskey, that means anyone buying American whiskey in Canada has to pay an extra 25%. If you are a U.S. whiskey company that sells most of its booze in Canada, you could potentially go out of business because Canadians may buy their whiskey from other sources — and American workers could lose their jobs. Tariffs imposed by the E.U. could affect about $3.4 billion worth of essential U.S. exports including steel, bourbon, peanut butter and orange juice, according to the Associated Press. Mexico’s tariffs would similarly impact almost $3 billion worth of American products. In addition to Canada, Mexico and the E.U., China also announced it is imposing a 25% tariff on more than 100 products it regularly imports from the U.S. in response to Trump’s tariffs. The tariffs being imposed by the E.U., Canada and Mexico are expected to go into effect in July, while some of China’s retaliatory tariffs went into effect in April. Here are some of the most common American goods that other countries have proposed retaliatory tariffs on as a result of Trump’s ongoing trade war. Canada Chocolate Whiskey Maple syrup Washing machines Cucumbers Sailboats Roasted coffee You can see a full list of the hundreds of U.S. products that could face tariffs in Canada here. European Union Peanut butter Motorcycles Cranberry juice Denim Corn T-shirts You can see a full list of the hundreds of U.S. products that could face tariffs by the E.U. here Mexico Apples Blueberries Pears Sausages Pork Lamps China Soybeans Cars Frozen orange juice Fresh beef Frozen boneless beef and beef chops Aircrafts You can see a full list of the hundreds of U.S. products that could face tariffs by China here.

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Those looking to take advantage of Sprint's $15 per month unlimited plan need to act fast. Really fast. The company plans to end the aggressive offer this Friday night at 11:59 p.m. ET, citing heavy demand from customers.

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