Publicly traded companies in the U.S. provide their shareholders with a voice on who runs the company. But corporate governance is not like a political democracy where voters usually choose between two candidates. The company’s slate of directors is typically the only one presented to its shareholders who have a limited choice - vote for the company’s slate or withhold their votes. Recently, however, the director election process has begun to become more democratic. This is happening gradually on an individual company basis under Delaware law, and not by a federal rule applicable to all…

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Investors are feeling good right now. Really good. By some measures, bullishness has reached levels not seen in more than 10 years. But the positive vibes are at odds with some hard data that suggests we're…

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Fearing increased risk and slipping standards, Wells Fargo will keep new subprime car loans to no more than 10 percent of its total auto loans.

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Steve Denning, a business professor whose work I mostly value for it’s reminder that focusing on the customer is the only route to value creation, has been touring France and visiting Michelin starred restaurants. He observed the following management traits at successful three starred restaurants that have been around for decades. You can also find them at successful startups:

  • There is no complacency
  • Care is taken to make good initial impressions
  • They do the simple things well
  • They create unexpected pleasures
  • They fix mistakes

You can read Denning’s full post here.

 



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Ajit Jain, who runs Berkshire Hathaway’s reinsurance business, and Greg Abel, who runs the conglomerate’s energy business, have emerged as favorites to succeed Warren Buffett as CEO.

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With a growth rate of 2.4 percent last year, the American economy was operating at 0.6 percentage points above its physical limits to non-inflationary economic activity.

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The U.S. stock market has been quiet this week - too quiet. Wall Street has traded in a tight range of late, with both volatility and trading volumes drying up as the earnings season winds down and Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen's recent Congressional testimony delivered no surprises.

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We all know that using your name and password to access websites and e-mails is far from a foolproof security system. Now, certain regulators are looking to do away with the system as it’s currently structured.

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This record-breaking winter shows the benefits of teleworking and flexible schedules.

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Now that Alexis Tsipras’ socialist bug has splattered against Angela Merkel’s reality windshield, it is timely to look at what the U.S. and Greece have in common. No, it’s not “unsustainable deficits and debt.” It’s the imperative of economic growth.
The conventional wisdom seems to be that a national debt equal to 175% of GDP (which is where Greece is now) is “unsustainable.” This is not true. England’s debt soared to more than 250% of GDP during the Napoleonic Wars, and yet England (which had a gold-backed pound that was even stronger than the euro) never defaulted.
So, what’s the…

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Government interference in agriculture began in the 1930s when FDR decided to address the issues of low farm income and the imbalance of power between small farmers with perishable crops and large buyers of those commodities. After some difficulty in convincing the Supreme Court that government handouts to farmers were allowed under the Constitution, we began an over 50 year saga of how governments can distort markets and cause harm to both market participants and taxpayers. Today’s farm policy is much smarter, much less market-distorting, and less financially burdensome on the taxpayer. The…

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<p>Republicans, in control of the legislature for the first time since the Great Depression, are pushing to pass a new Coal Jobs and Safety Act. They say the legislation will cut red tape and lower industry costs, while union members worry it will lower safety thresholds. While both sides have long joined together to oppose U.S. environmental rules that hurt Big Coal, the state campaign has them on different sides.</p>

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India has been chasing the Chinese economic dragon for years. But revised GDP calculations could end the pursuit sooner than expected.

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You wouldn't think of overpaying $50,000 when buying a new house, but you could pay that much extra if you're not careful shopping for a mortgage.

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NEW YORK ( TheStreet) — Berkshire Hathaway Chairman Warren Buffett called 2014 "a good year for Berkshire on all major fronts except one" and told investors a "motherlode of opportunies runs through America." In his annual letter to Berkshire investors–which is widely followed by the investing community–Buffett said the only setback was the performance of Berkshire's BNSF Railways, the second-largest freight railway network in North America. …

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