Instead of hiring holiday workers, Walmart is asking employees to take on extra hours

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The number is thankfully in decline, but as of 2010 over 2 billion of the worlds inhabitants had never flipped on a light switch. In the U.S. we understandably hurt for hurricane-ravaged Puerto Ricans who may go without electricity for months, but our compassion is magnified by the happy truth that most of us have never lived without it ourselves.
In India, nearly half of its citizens dont have access to toilets. This is particularly difficult for the countrys women who seek secluded outdoor areas to relieve themselves in groups as a way of avoiding male assault. India is a…

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Republicans are eager to drive down business tax rates in a bid to boost economic growth. But their tax proposal to create a new special rate for business income potentially puts high-income wage earners at a disadvantage.

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There is so much demand for housing and so few homes for sale, that prices have nowhere to go but up — unless they get so high that no one wants to buy.

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Steve Pruett has seen more than his share of booms in three decades in the oil business. None, though, as strange as the one gripping the Permian Basin right now.

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Two women kiss in front a big fire. A woman and a man kiss underwater. Giant waving inflatable tubes flail in the middle of a forest. Another girl holds up a live chicken to the sky in what could be rural Nevada. Or Chile. Or maybe upstate New York. Could this imagery convince millennials to buy diamonds? Maybe so. But…

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You can easily use your employer plan to create a brighter financial future.

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross recent proposal to make NAFTA subject to a five-year sunset clause would be like turning home ownership into a leasing arrangement. That would undercut one of the biggest advantages of ownership the long-term incentive for investing in improvements. Imposing an automatic five-year termination clause on NAFTA would have the same impact on cross-border investment discouraging it, cutting off supply chains, and foregoing the efficiencies that are gained from buying and selling in a bigger market.
The best argument for NAFTA is that it helps make access…

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Most U.S. business economists doubt the economy will grow as fast as President Trump and Republicans are counting on to help pay for tax cuts.

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The world is turning against tech. Silicon Valley is in danger of becoming the new Wall Street – public enemy number one. And it’s easy to see why. Facebook is being used to influence elections and promote hate speech. Google is pressuring think tanks to fire people they don’t like. And meanwhile Uber has grown into one of the most obnoxious companies on the planet. That’s just the news in 2017. To that, you can add enduring concerns over privacy, the dangers of AI, losing our children to their devices, and perhaps most dangerous of all, a growing sense that tech is a leading cause of the growing inequality of wealth. Meanwhile, we are easy to ridicule.

All this has come as a bit of a shock to much of the tech ecosystem. Collectively we’ve been happily beavering away, content that our work is driving innovation, economic growth and job creation. We haven’t been wrong. Young companies are responsible for nearly 100% of net job creation.

We have, however, been in denial about the negative side of the massive growth in tech. It’s easy to be dismissive of privacy concerns as misguided (been there, got the t-shirt) but they matter deeply to a lot of people. Similarly, with kids spending all their time on their phones; there are pros and cons and it’s easy to focus on the pros – it’s truly fantastic that my children have all the world’s information at their fingertips.

But, as with most everything in life, tech has its good sides and its bad sides. What’s important is that we recognise that as a fact. Otherwise we aren’t listening to our critics, and so, in turn, they won’t listen to us. This was probably always true, but it’s pressing now that tech is such a large part of society. On 30 June this year, the four largest companies in the world by market cap were Apple, Alphabet (Google), Microsoft and Amazon. Facebook was number eight. Products of the tech industry are now everywhere, all of the time and it’s not surprising people are paying attention.

Our opportunity is to move to a more nuanced and honest dialogue. It’s important to continually re-emphasise the good that comes out of the startup ecosystem, mostly jobs and productivity growth. But in the same breath, we should acknowledge that some of the fruits of our labour are hurting us and need regulating. Perhaps more challenging is to recognise that change is scary to some people and that their opinion is as valid as ours. We should start to look beyond simply creating enduring companies, to how we can build technology and businesses which can have a long-lasting positive impact.

None of this is too difficult. Lots of the raw ingredients are there already. We have data on the positive impact that startups have on jobs and the economy and we have lots of great products and much-loved companies. AirBnB stands out to me as a good example that has hit a lot of scale, and there are literally thousands of smaller companies I could cite. We should continue to tell this side of our story much as we have been, but start thinking like members of society rather than tech advocates when it comes to issues like those listed above. That will be easier if we stop identifying with Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon and Facebook. They aren’t startups anymore. They are large self-interested institutions with a big influence on society which, inevitably, has its good sides and its bad sides.

If we don’t move to a more honest dialogue, we will end up in a shouting match with the rest of society, where neither side is hearing the other. There are important policy issues that we need to address and if we don’t go about it in the right way news like last Friday’s announcement from TFL that they won’t be renewing Uber’s license to operate in London will start to become the norm rather than the exception. I am hopeful that calm heads will prevail in that situation and more generally but that will only happen if we in the tech industry open our hearts and minds to the concerns of other parts of society.



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You don’t have children to get rich.

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Unprecedented is an overused word in financial markets — but this time it's justified.

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Republican tax negotiators are targeting a corporate tax rate of 20 percent, according to two people familiar with the matter. That would be higher than President Donald Trump wants — setting up a key decision for the president on a top legislative priority.

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Protectionists and neo-luddites invariably claim that compassion demands we protect and preserve jobs, regardless of how economically inefficient they may be, lest many are left out of the economy. But assuming that many cannot perform tasks that a productive economy requires is not showing compassion. It is demonstrating condescension. It is assuming that human potential is limited, rather than boundless.
When politicians and others complain that good jobs are disappearing, they actually mean semi-skill jobs traditionally well-paying jobs one can be hired for straight out of high…

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